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Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Wall of Predjudice at Carroll University

Carroll University is where my oldest son attends college. Just this past week ~the school has become a news topic. These are two of the articles written (I couldn't get the news video to load)
WAUKESHA- A project meant to teach a lesson is actually creating a controversy.A makeshift wall at Carroll University filled with vile words was supposed to spark a discussion about fighting prejudice, but some people say the wall has done more harm than good. Members of the Pi Lambda Phi Fraternity constructed the wall Monday and invited students to write all the sexist, racist and homophobic names they've ever been called on it.The wall was moved from it's original street-side spot, after neighbors and parents of a nearby elementary school complained. Then someone spray painted a portion of the wall and some students feel vile language, just perpetuates hate.The wall will be around until Thursday and students will be charged a small fee to take a hammer to it.Proceeds will be donated to an anti-defamation group.

WAUKESHA — It’s called the “Wall of Prejudice,” and it’s creating a lot of buzz on the Carroll University campus in Waukesha. On the wall, Carroll students are asked to write words that are used to discriminate and stereotype, and most FOX6 News is unable to show.
Carroll University student Sam Green says he is concerned the wall may be sending some unintended messages. “There’s a lot of people not affiliated with the school that don’t know what it’s really about, so that’s a problem. There is a middle school right around the corner, so I don’t know how kids will react. They’re going to ask people what these words mean that they’ve never seen before,” Green said.
Mike Zanotelli is president of the Pi Lambda Phi fraternity, that focuses on the elimination of prejudice. The fraternity came up with the idea for the “Wall of Prejudice.” “Issues like this are often kept in the closet. It’s something that no one really wants to talk about, so no change ever really happens. (The wall) should help bring awareness to the things that people find hurtful and that would help stimulate conversation, which thankfully, it already has,” Zanotelli said.
Later in the week, Carroll students will tear the wall down with hammers and bats – symbolically breaking down the prejudices.
Carroll University officials approved the wall, and say it is drawing a lot of attention. Theresa Barry, Dean of Students, says the university has gotten feedback both positive and negative. The feedback caused school officials to move the wall farther from the street, but not too far to stop the stimulation of student conversation. “That’s what we want people to talk about – ‘wow, you’ve been called that in your life? What was that like? What does it mean to you?’” Barry said.